1930s dating guide for women

07-Dec-2019 03:30 by 7 Comments

1930s dating guide for women - british relationships dating men

There have always been hidden rules and etiquette that make us look back and wonder if we did everything correctly.

From the way a woman should dress to the amount of alcohol she should have, and from how much she talks to her communication with the waiter, these rules were probably a woman’s worst nightmare -or best friend some may say.This 1930s set of dating tips doesn’t have any opponents.It was a different time you’ll say, different people, different customs, and even though we might agree, we still find these “rules” extremely hilarious.A few months ago, my mother uncovered a college paper that my Grandmother Bailey (her mother) had written when she was at Oberlin College.She saw that the topic was right up my alley, so sent it along to me.The world of dating in America has changed dramatically over the last century.

Some may argue that in today's society, it is nonexistent and has been replaced by what many young people refer to as "hooking up." With the advent of new technologies (e.g., cell phones, instant messaging, video chatting, etc.) and the changing definitions of traditional dating and families, "dating" has become a more open and self-interpreted institution over the century.

Scarcity was a common theme, and this mindset may have impacted dating life in this decade as well.

Competitive dating, or “The Rating and Dating Complex” (by sociologist Willard Waller) dominated youth culture.

Apparently, the only keys to successful dating in the 1930’s for single women were don’t talk too much, wear a bra, and don’t pass out in the middle of your date because you’re drunk: If you enjoyed this ridiculous 1938 dating guide for single women, check out bizarre sexist vintage ads and frightening Republican quotes about women!

The dating world has never been an easy and comfortable place.

The paper is titled “Building Healthy Sex Knowledge” and was written for a child development course (and is marked up by the professor) by Virginia Moore Patterson 75 years ago ~ on December 15, 1937.