Who is chan marshall dating

03-Nov-2019 15:02 by 4 Comments

Who is chan marshall dating

Back when she was a mess, on stage as Cat Power and off stage as Chan (pronounced Shawn) Marshall, it was almost impossible to predict which version of the singer/songwriter would show up for an interview.

"I'm putting, like, a recycled aluminum-foil crown on her head. No one taught me how to do that except my friends and, like, my dog and the birds and the clear water from the mountain.But her muse was calling – or, as she puts it, "The knock on the door in the back of my head was just, like, piling up." She returned to the Boat, Flea's L. "The only other instrument there was, like, a tambourine and some maracas and a drum set and several synthesizer things that I've never turned on before.So when I turned that on: ' Oh, that sounds cool.' So I press 'record.'" From there, she recruited engineer Philippe Zdar – who has worked with Phoenix and the Beastie Boys – and created the most fully realized arrangements of her career, playing most instruments herself.You’ve said you’ve been drinking since you were very young. People who drink habitually don’t realize they’re doing it, because it was part of their upbringing. It’s been reported that you’ve had seven drinks in seven months. That was the second time I checked myself into the hospital, when I found out that he was with somebody else. Maybe Susanna is just part of your split personality. Everybody from my immediate family to my grandparents to my great-grandparents — there were always severe alcoholic and psychological problems. I never really thought, “When something bad happens, you go to the bar and turn off your emotions.” I never realized that I’d gotten to the point of such depression. "I wasn't just sitting around eating bonbons for six years," says Marshall, 40, who's hanging out at the moment in West Hollywood's Chateau Marmont, which she describes approvingly as a "CIA lockdown hotel." "I was busting my ass." The other subject she doesn't like hearing about: the possibility that the melancholy songs on have anything to do with her four-year relationship with actor Giovanni Ribisi.

"It's more about, like, actually me really composing an album than anybody I'm dating," she says.If your parents gave you fire to play with when you were two, you’d be standing in fire by the time you were an adult. It wasn’t for drinking — this was for a reaction to drinking. [Before my most recent hospital stay] I was drinking from the time I woke up in the morning until the time I went to bed. Her penchant for reinterpreting other people’s songs (her wholly irreverent take on the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” is already a classic) placed her in the rarefied territory of a Nina Simone, or even a Bob Dylan, two artists whose songs she has often sung, and whose own storied—and sometimes troubled—careers occasionally mirrored her own. In order to create the song as it exists in my mind, I have to be mathematical—the mathematical part on one side of my brain that plays the song in the right tempo, doesn’t fuck up the notes. I remember seeing you at the Knitting Factory in almost complete darkness—just you and a piano—and you would play these beautiful snippets of songs with these long passages of silence in between. There was almost a performance- art aspect to the whole thing, except you clearly seemed terrified. You’re hoping and praying that you and the audience can meet at the same place, some place that’s not here nor there but some “other” place altogether. A lot of people might not know about the sort of experimental, punk-rock origins of Cat Power—or that you can play drums. I also recorded in Miami at South Beach Studios and worked with some amazing people there . MARSHALL: You shouldn’t say that, it makes us sound so old! RACHEL: When it comes to talking about making music—specifically, your process for writing songs—you’ve always played that pretty close to the vest. People need to be reminded sometimes about what real liberty means—the idea that you can do whatever the fuck you want. Her infamously erratic live shows—characterized by rambling interludes, breakdowns, and a predilection for stopping midsong—reflected her battles with a variety of personal issues, anxieties, and addictions. RACHEL: Has making a record where you play every single instrument been on your mind for a while? RACHEL: You just felt like you couldn’t do it before? And then there is the other part of the song— the other side of my brain—the spiritual, animal, beautiful part of performing that has nothing to do with math and everything to do with feeling. People in the audience kept shouting things like, “I love you, keep going! MARSHALL: Well, I can’t really play drums or synthesizers, and I don’t really know how to take a beat and cut it up and drop it into a song or duplicate it into a computer program. RACHEL: You’ve lived all over the place since you left New York about a decade ago. RACHEL: Well, we met when we were both 12 years old, here in the East Village . I can probably count on one hand the number of times we’ve really talked about that stuff. RACHEL: I just got the feeling that it was something you desperately didn’t want to talk about. And so much of the time people think they’re doing that, but really they’re just chasing money, not freedom. Some people don’t want to leave their cubicle on the farm. There’s always gonna be something about this city, something that when you are here and you look up and see the moon, the most natural thing in the world, it makes everyone the same. If there was a full moon, my grandmother would get me and my sister out of bed and we’d go sit outside in our nightgowns. If there really is such a thing as a true “indie-rock” rock star, then Chan Marshall—the mercurial singer-songwriter known as Cat Power—is it. When you performed back in the early 2000s, you often seemed so uncomfortable on stage. Being able to just sing—just singing—totally changed me. called The Boat, then I rented a house in Malibu and built a studio there. MARSHALL: That’s a fucking good question, and something interesting I haven’t really thought about. And then when it does, you just repeat it over and over until someone hands you a pen and you can write it down. Yes, because I miss my friends, so many of whom came to New York for the same reasons I came here, which was not to work on Wall Street.